If I recall my history correctly, this is the final boss America had to fight in World War II.

If I recall my history correctly, this is the final boss America had to fight in World War II.

(Source: fuckyeahviralpics)

ESSAY PROBLEMS

lifeatmac:

at first an idea goes off in your head like:

image

but then you try to write down and it’s just like:

image

historicalfirearms:

Magazine Lee-Metford

The Short Magazine Lee-Enfield is world renowned and is thought by many to be the finest bolt action battle rifle ever fielded.  However, it’s immediate predecessor, the Magazine Lee-Metford, remains little known, chronically overshadowed by its more illustrious kin.  

The Magazine Lee-Metford (MLM) was adopted in 1889 after a lengthy selection process, it replaced the lever-actioned single shot Martini-Henry rifle which had been in service since 1871.  The MLM was revolutionary for its time, it included many of the features which would later be incorporated into the SMLE, including a detachable box magazine and the excellent Lee-Pattern bolt.  The MLM was the joining of three excellent inovations: James Paris Lee’s smooth cock-on-closing bolt and ‘z’ springed box magazine and William Ellis Metford’s barrel rifling.  

The Lee-Metford entered service just in time to see action during the Second Boer War where it lacked the long range of the Boer Commando’s Mausers. In addition to this the MLM was the last British service rifle to use black powder cartridges, which produced clouds of smoke when fired, this also gave away the position of the rifleman.  This led the the British Army considering the adoption of a Mauser actioned rifle, with the early development of what would become the Enfield 1914 Pattern.  However the looming threat of war in Europe saw the Small Arms Board instead opt to continue development of the Lee design, with the more resilient Enfield barrel replacing Metford’s polygonal barrel rifling which suffered from corrosion from the new smokeless cartridges.  

The MLM’s service life did not however end with the introduction of the MLE and later the SMLE in 1904.  As the photographs above show the MLM saw service during the First World War.  The MLM MkII was re-barrelled to combat the corrosiveness of the new smokeless cartridge and with the limited number of SMLE’s available in 1914 with the expansion of the British Army the MLM was issued to numerous regiments.  Above the MLM can be see in the hands of the King’s Liverpool Regiment, the Manchester Regiment and the brilliant top photograph shows a lance corporal, of the Gloucesters, in the en guarde position with his Magazine Lee-Metford.

The MLM remained in service well into the 1920s and later with colonial units but by the beginning of the Second World War all but the most far flung reserve units had been re-equipped.  

Sources:

Image One Source:

A Lance Corporal of the Gloucestershire Regiment in the en guard position c.1914.  

Image Two Source:

Left & right views of a Magazine-Lee-Metford, the unusual flip up volley sight can be seen on the lower photograph (left hand side of the rifle). 

Image Three Source & Image Four Source :

Photographs 3 and 4 above show men of the King’s (Liverpool)  Regiment navigate a communication trench heading to the front, circa 1916, and below that men of the Manchester Regiment on the march circa. 1914.


The Lee-Enfield Rifle - Martin Pegler (2012)
historicalfirearms:

Rifle Training
Recruits of the ‘Grimsby Chums’,which would later become the 10th Battalion, The Lincolnshire Regiment, at rifle drill during their training.
Note the recruits still in their civilian clothes. During the initial call up for volunteers for the ‘chums’ or ‘Pals’ battalions in 1915 there were not enough uniforms available from regimental stores to clothe all new recruits. The men of the Grimsby Chums have however been lucky enough to be issued with the Short Magazine Lee-Enfield (SMLE), some battalions were instead issued with the longer, older Magazine Lee-Enfield (MLE MKI) or the earlier Magazine Lee-Metford (MLM).
The Grimsby Chums were one of the earliest Pals battalions, formed from ex pupils of Grimsby’s Wintringham Secondary School. They first saw action in 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.
Image Source

historicalfirearms:

Rifle Training

Recruits of the ‘Grimsby Chums’,which would later become the 10th Battalion, The Lincolnshire Regiment, at rifle drill during their training.

Note the recruits still in their civilian clothes. During the initial call up for volunteers for the ‘chums’ or ‘Pals’ battalions in 1915 there were not enough uniforms available from regimental stores to clothe all new recruits. The men of the Grimsby Chums have however been lucky enough to be issued with the Short Magazine Lee-Enfield (SMLE), some battalions were instead issued with the longer, older Magazine Lee-Enfield (MLE MKI) or the earlier Magazine Lee-Metford (MLM).

The Grimsby Chums were one of the earliest Pals battalions, formed from ex pupils of Grimsby’s Wintringham Secondary School. They first saw action in 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Image Source

historicalfirearms:

Canadian Colt-Browning M1895
The caption to this German postcard reads: “English surreptitious patrol, equipped with a take-down machine gun, is trying to reach cover.”
The profiles of the Ross MkIII rifles the men are carrying and the very presence of a Colt-Browning 1895, which was used by the Canadian Army between 1899 and 1915, indicate that this Machine Gun Section are Canadian rather than English. The Canadian Experditionary Force used the M1895 during the first two years of the First World War, but they were steadily replaced by the British Vickers .303.  The Canadian M1895’s were then passed on to the exiled Belgian forces fighting in Northern France where they saw continued action.  
The first Canadian troops did not reach France until the end of 1914 and their first substantial involvement came in 1915 at the Battle of Ypres.  The ground the men are covering and the uniforms they are wearing indicate that the photograph was most probably taken prior to the beginning of WWI during a training exercise either in Canada or in Britain prior to the C.E.F’s initial deployment to France. 
Source

historicalfirearms:

Canadian Colt-Browning M1895

The caption to this German postcard reads: “English surreptitious patrol, equipped with a take-down machine gun, is trying to reach cover.”

The profiles of the Ross MkIII rifles the men are carrying and the very presence of a Colt-Browning 1895, which was used by the Canadian Army between 1899 and 1915, indicate that this Machine Gun Section are Canadian rather than English. The Canadian Experditionary Force used the M1895 during the first two years of the First World War, but they were steadily replaced by the British Vickers .303.  The Canadian M1895’s were then passed on to the exiled Belgian forces fighting in Northern France where they saw continued action.  

The first Canadian troops did not reach France until the end of 1914 and their first substantial involvement came in 1915 at the Battle of Ypres.  The ground the men are covering and the uniforms they are wearing indicate that the photograph was most probably taken prior to the beginning of WWI during a training exercise either in Canada or in Britain prior to the C.E.F’s initial deployment to France. 

Source

pookerskull:

#rainbow out of found objects Ih my painting class #sheridancollege #colours

pookerskull:

#rainbow out of found objects Ih my painting class #sheridancollege #colours